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“Confidence Man,” Maggie Haberman’s biography of the former president, argues that it’s essential to grasp New York’s steamy, histrionic folkways.
A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.
Joanna Quinn’s “The Whalebone Theatre” breathlessly follows a trio of British youngsters from frolics on the beach to service and spycraft.
Joanna Quinn’s “The Whalebone Theatre” breathlessly follows a trio of British youngsters from frolics on the beach to service and spycraft.
Igiaba Scego, an author born in Rome to Somali parents, recommends books that draw readers through the rich layers that make up her hometown.
In his new novel, “The Family Izquierdo,” Rubén Degollado follows the ups and downs of one Tejano family haunted by an enduring curse.
An essay celebrating the story’s 75th anniversary prompted an outpouring from our readers.
Kamila Shamsie’s new novel, “Best of Friends,” follows its title characters from their Pakistani girlhoods to their adult lives in London.
A new, unauthorized biography reveals intimate, often raw, details of the TV star’s life and death. And it’s drawing criticism from many of his friends and family.
In “Listen, World!,” Julia Scheeres and Allison Gilbert present a portrait of the pioneering journalist Elsie Robinson.
Laura Warrell’s debut novel, “Sweet, Soft, Plenty Rhythm,” features a rugged trumpet player and all the women he disappoints.
In Kim Hye-jin’s “Concerning My Daughter,” an unnamed mother laments her adult child’s life choices, even as she takes her back in.
A new history by Donald Yacovone examines the racist ideas that endured for generations in educational materials.
In Namwali Serpell’s novel “The Furrows,” a childhood tragedy brings a lifetime of strange encounters.
Following the world’s twee-est band down the Pacific Coast after a divorce and the death of a parent.
Special powers, avian obsession and visions of the future fuel these transporting and entertaining tales.
In “Stay True,” Hua Hsu, a staff writer for The New Yorker, recounts his relationship with an Asian American college friend, whose search for identity quietly shaped the author’s own.
Jonathan Coe’s novel “Mr. Wilder and Me” explores the late career of a legendary Hollywood director.
In Stephanie LaCava’s novel “I Fear My Pain Interests You,” a young actress manages the strains of family and failed romance.

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