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Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
In Marilyn Stasio’s new crime-fiction column, the bodies accumulate at a rather alarming rate.
He fostered the careers of more than a dozen Nobel laureates, including Gabriel García Márquez, Nadine Gordimer and Doris Lessing.
When all you’ve got is a blanket and a lot of snacks, you can become “The Very Hungry Caterpillar,” and other desperate moves.
Ian McGuire talks about his new novel, and Elisabeth Egan discusses Romy Hausmann’s “Dear Child.”
Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.
Douglas Stuart, a fashion designer, started writing fiction on the side. Now his first book is up for the Booker Prize and the National Book Award.
In “Billion Dollar Loser,” Reeves Wiedeman places the once exalted Silicon Valley founder in the context of contemporary capitalism.
In “Billion Dollar Loser,” Reeves Wiedeman places the once exalted Silicon Valley founder in the context of contemporary capitalism.
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
The former national security adviser H.R. McMaster’s new book, “Battlegrounds,” examines recent foreign policy and charts a path forward.
Looking for a book that will scare the pants off you? We’ve got some suggestions.
“In plainer terms, we read literature to have a good time.”
In this new take on the Roald Dahl book, Robert Zemeckis sets loose his cameras, and Octavia Spencer side-eyes Anne Hathaway.
Molly Stern, the former publisher of Crown, is starting Zando, an independent publishing company with an unusual marketing strategy.
A poem that reminds us again how impossible certain departures or absences feel.
In “Trust,” the wunderkind politician underscores the importance of what he calls “overlapping circles of belonging.”
In “A World Beneath the Sands,” Toby Wilkinson details the hundred years when many of the great discoveries of ancient Egypt were made, by Europeans.
Karla Cornejo Villavicencio, a National Book Award finalist for “The Undocumented Americans,” talks immigration, her unconventional approach to nonfiction and why impostor syndrome doesn’t faze her.
Reeves Wiedeman writes about the WeWork co-founder Adam Neumann and what the company represents about the last decade.

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