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Explore the cities, countries, regions and states in Travel’s “52 Places to Go in 2019” through these books.
Dave Eggers, Joyce Carol Oates and others will also take part in the festival, whose theme is the narrowing gap between public and private life.
“I’ve read the books many times to my own children, astonished at how much is in them for my grown-up self — about that growing-up process, and about the times I grew up in, too.”
The journalist, whose new book is “Nobody’s Looking at You: Essays,” read indiscriminately in her youth: “Bookish children are not critics. They just like to read.”
An annual celebration, this year attended by some 300 costumed revelers, is one of the regular events around the country that unite both the novelist’s hard-core fans and period dance enthusiasts.
J.R.R. Tolkien — the artist, the writer, the scholar — is the subject of an exhibition at the Morgan Library & Museum. The show is a comprehensive view of his alternate reality.
In Amy Greenberg’s “Lady First,” Sarah Polk — the wife of President James K. Polk — emerges as a powerful strategist who wielded her status with a velvet vengeance.
The daughter of Gui Minhai, a Swedish bookseller detained in China, said the ambassador arranged a meeting with men who first offered to help, then cajoled and pressured her.
Readers have noticed an overlap between “The Woman in the Window,” by A.J. Finn — a pen name for Dan Mallory — and Sarah A. Denzil’s “Saving April.”
Readers have noticed an overlap between “The Woman in the Window,” by A.J. Finn — a pen name for Dan Mallory — and Sarah A. Denzil’s “Saving April.”
Meg Wolitzer’s novel is our February pick for the PBS NewsHour-New York Times book club, “Now Read This.”
Randall, a poet and librarian, started the press out of his home, eventually publishing the work of about 200 writers amid Detroit’s flowering Black Arts Movement.
In his book “Parkland,” Dave Cullen follows the survivors of the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on their quest to change gun laws and heal themselves.
In “Walk This Way,” the reporter Geoff Edgers tells the story of a crucial moment in the history of pop music.
Daniel Immerwahr’s provocative and absorbing history draws attention to those islands and archipelagos too often sidelined in the national imagination.
Studying diaries, letters and more, she found that women, in the South and beyond, were not just passive observers of the vital events of their time.
Feeling like you’ve kissed too many frogs? Given up on love altogether? These books might provide some escape this Valentine’s Day.
“We Cast a Shadow,” a first novel by Maurice Carlos Ruffin, is a hilarious and profound meditation on racial bias, and how it warps our capacity for love.
With her husband, Alvin Toffler, she was half of a team that produced global best-sellers, including “Future Shock.” Recognition was belated.
“Bowlaway,” Elizabeth McCracken’s first novel in 18 years, is a family saga, a burlesque chronicle of eccentrics and a fractured, fanciful fable.

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