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NYTimes XML

Curtis Dawkins, a fiction writer who is serving a life sentence for murder in Michigan, says his children shouldn’t have to pay for his sins.
Mr. Bennett, the author of “Before the Mayflower” and other books, was also a top editor at Ebony magazine for decades.
Halliday discusses her debut novel, and Naomi Novik and Gerald Jonas remember the life and work of Ursula K. Le Guin.
A reporter who spent a decade covering Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaigns talks about her adjustment to book leave and finding the “foreign land where writers live.”
“The Maze at Windermere,” by Gregory Blake Smith, imagines Newport, R.I., from the 17th century to today. “Peculiar Ground,” by Lucy Hughes-Hallett, does the same for a British estate.
It was the 1980s, she was waitressing, “and there was a lot of Aqua Net involved. I took the hint. No more food service. Lots more time at the keyboard.”
In Matt Haig’s new novel, “How to Stop Time,” the narrator — born in 1581, and still alive today — seems to be having a midlife crisis.
Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
In the Dory Fantasmagory books, Abby Hanlon finds the humor — and the coping strategies — in a young heroine’s shifting line between imagination and reality.
Clever, beautifully illustrated new books from Brian Selznick, Sara Varon and Bryan Collier that are easy to read — and to love.
Three new books on the challenge of drawing confident conclusions from an uncertain world.
Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.
A teenager in distress turns to a famous novel with the hope of normalizing her situation. Instead, it provides a road map of escape.
Allegations of mistreatment of women flooded the children’s publishing industry over the past week and ensnared James Dashner, the author of the “Maze Runner” series.
Michelle McNamara died before she completed her book about the Golden State Killer; her husband, Patton Oswalt didn’t want her work to be in vain.
Patrisse Khan-Cullors’s memoir, “When They Call You a Terrorist,” recounts the life of a Black Lives Matter co-founder.
A primer of the books and films to get you ready for the Broadway opening of “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two.”
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
In which we consult the Book Review’s past to shed light on the books of the present. This week: Francine Prose on Ursula K. Le Guin.
Junichiro Tanizaki’s early novel “In Black and White” uses nested murder plots to explore the guilt and responsibilities of the writing life.

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