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A very good movie from Marcel Proust’s very great novel will be screened in a new digital restoration by Film Society of Lincoln Center.
Laura Lippman’s new novel, “Sunburn,” draws its inspiration from 1940s noir like “Double Indemnity.”
In “The Kiss,” Brian Turner collects musings on all aspects of the act, from the romantic to the familial to the tragic.
What one reader learned about sex from the best-selling novels of his childhood.
What do the noble mastiff, the lowly cur and the trundle-tail have in common besides being terms for dogs?
David Grann’s true crime tale is our February pick for the new PBS NewsHour-New York Times book club, “Now Read This.”
Emily Chang’s book looks at the way male cliques in the tech world use their newfound wealth and power to get whatever it is they had previously been denied — mainly stuff, status and sex.
Erica Garza’s debut memoir, “Getting Off,” reveals a path to rehabilitation that is equal parts sordid and inspiring.
In Molly McCloskey’s novel “Straying,” a feckless American marries into an Irish family, then looks for love elsewhere.
In Tayari Jones’s new novel, “An American Marriage,” a newlywed black attorney is wrongly convicted of rape.
With roots in both Nicaragua and El Salvador, she wrote eloquently of sorrow and struggle.
“Asymmetry” juxtaposes the story of a May-December romance (in which the man closely resembles Philip Roth) with the tragedy of an Iraqi-American family.
The novelist Tayari Jones keeps a Bible even though she was raised without religion: “I’ve come to understand that, as a black Southerner, I am a Christian, whether I am observant or not.”
In “Fire Sermon,” the author of the story collection “I Want to Show You More” describes a married woman’s love affair.
A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.
Peggy Orenstein reviews “Buzz” and “Vibrator Nation,” two new books about the history and significance of sex toys.
Verses that will forge bonds between you and your little ones through the power of language.
In Sigrid Nunez’s charming new novel, “The Friend,” a woman in a small Manhattan apartment inherits a large dog from a man who committed suicide.
Why is the tech industry populated with so many aggressive dudes and so few women? Emily Chang examined the issue in her book, “Brotopia,” and shared her findings with us.
Elizabeth Flock’s “The Heart Is a Shifting Sea” provides a close-up look at three couples in Mumbai.

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