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Rachel Louise Snyder’s “No Visible Bruises” recounts the horror of domestic violence in all its forms and argues for a more systematic approach to this abuse.
Lucy Ives’s debut novel, “Loudermilk,” satirizes both “bro” culture and the culture of creative writing programs in one fell swoop.
Readers respond to Joseph J. Ellis’s review of Rick Atkinson’s “The British Are Coming.”
John Okada’s 1957 novel about a Japanese-American draft resister has been republished by Penguin Classics, raising questions over its ownership.
Mr. von Ribbentrop spent nearly six years in combat. His father, Germany’s foreign minister, was hanged as a war criminal.
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
An intimate account of the 2015 hate crime and its aftermath, “Grace Will Lead Us Home,” by Jennifer Berry Hawes, explores how those affected struggled to carry on.
These books — some classics, some published this year — tell the stories of the soldiers and spies who fought to defeat the Axis forces.
The magazine, which will publish its final issue this month after 20 years, set out to become a home for underrepresented voices in the literary landscape.
Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
The Dutch case of Noa Pothoven, 17, who had written about being a rape victim and her experience with mental illness, ricocheted around the globe. But initial stories got it wrong.
Matthew Lopez’s drama, inspired by the novel “Howards End” and presented in two parts, won this year’s Olivier Award for best new play.
Mary Beth Keane was researching a historical novel when “real life kept intervening,” so she wrote a contemporary saga of suburban New York instead.
The Dutch case of Noa Pothoven, 17, who had written about being a rape victim and her experience with mental illness, ricocheted around the globe. But initial stories got it wrong.
The Los Angeles crime novelist, whose new book is “This Storm,” is no fan of Cormac McCarthy’s work: “McCarthy fails to employ quotation marks. Neither did William Faulkner, another cat I don’t dig.”
“The Ministry of Truth,” by Dorian Lynskey, is a “biography” of the 1949 novel, an enduring icon of state power devoid of moral principle and human concern.
A leading librarian who championed high tech, she dueled with preservationists like Nicholson Baker over how best to protect the written word for posterity.
We’ve revisited the books that defined the season over the past 50 years — and what they reveal about the country at a particular moment.
Wolf’s study of the criminalization of same-sex relationships in the Victorian era is the latest work by her to run afoul of fact-checkers.
In “The Pandemic Century” Mark Honigsbaum covers nine outbreaks that shaped how we think and respond to diseases.

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