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Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.
What, you thought it was all iambic pentameter and chamomile tea?
Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.
The cartoonist turns to the late playwright’s collected works as solace in a heartless world.
Our columnist recommends novels and stories that address the power of classical music.
After accusations of sexual harassment were made public, Mr. Asher’s book sales declined, and he was dropped by his literary agent. He is seeking a trial and damages.
Four novels take readers back in time. Among these adventures: smuggling runaway slaves, charging San Juan Hill and performing Shakespeare in Dartmoor Prison.
In “The World According to Fannie Davis,” Bridgett M. Davis tells the extraordinary story of her mother, a Detroit numbers runner.
A novel from Meg Wolitzer and Holly Goldberg Sloan, a revamp of the Baby-Sitters Club, and more in the latest funny books for middle-grade readers.
Eric Rutkow’s “The Longest Line on the Map” recounts the repeated efforts to build a Pan-American highway.
The Half King, a bar favored by war correspondents and conflict photographers, endured all kinds of disasters in its 19 years. Then came the tourists.
The heroine of Dana Czapnick’s debut novel, “The Falconer,” feels most at home shooting hoops at her prep school gym.
The English author, whose critically lauded autobiographies chronicled her romantic and sexual liaisons, attained literary celebrity in her 90s.
Suggested reading from critics and editors from The New York Times.
Pete Buttigieg’s “Shortest Way Home” tells the story of an accomplished and ambitious man who is the latest contender to enter the race for the presidency.
Benedict Wells’s fourth novel is his first to be translated into English after gaining much praise in Europe.
“The Mister,” which will follow two new characters in an erotic love story, will be released on April 16.
The English author, whose critically lauded autobiographies chronicled her romantic and sexual liaisons, attained literary celebrity in her 90s.
The author, most recently, of the novel “Bowlaway” prefers physical books for the sense of accomplishment: “I like to hold the chunk of remaining book as I read; I like to feel it diminish.”

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