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NYTimes XML

Everywhere Denis Johnson went, he portrayed himself as an openhearted American bumbler not unlike his hapless characters.
In his new book, James Suzman writes about the Bushmen hunter-gatherers and what they have taught him about how the modern world lives.
Jailed at 5, blacklisted in Hollywood, the author of “Going Away” fell in with R.D. Laing and Doris Lessing.
Joshua Green talks about “Devil’s Bargain”; Laura Dassow Walls discusses her new biography of Thoreau; and Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich on “The Fact of a Body.”
Gary Panter — known for his punk graphics, the sets of “Pee-wee’s Playhouse” and Jimbo — returns to graphic novels with a phantasmagoric take on “Paradise Regained.”
Three explorations of American foodways delve into the cookbooks and culinary preoccupations of the past, with a special emphasis on Southern cuisine.
“Down a Dark Road” is the ninth book in Linda Castillo’s series. “I love the juxtaposition of such a bucolic setting and the introduction of evil,” she says.
From contemporary Los Angeles to medieval Venice, bad guys romp in new mysteries from Richard Lange, Ace Atkins, S.D. Sykes and Michael Connelly.
Six new paperbacks to check out this week.
In “The Fact of a Body,” Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich recounts how her memories resurfaced when her law firm took on the case of a pedophile.
“Quiet Until the Thaw” follows two reservation boys whose lives become fatefully intertwined.
Three books trace the highs and the (very) lows of love and marriage, says our memoir columnist, Meghan Daum.
A reader responds to a misstated metaphor, an author defends his work and more.
To build a lasting fan base in the relentless world of espionage thrillers, Brad Thor has cranked out 17 books in 16 years, selling nearly 15 million copies.
A film about a prize for excellence in journalism and the arts shares some winners’ insights, but not enough.
Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.
The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comic book series, by Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill, will wrap things up with “The Tempest” in June.
From Hillary Clinton to a White House stenographer, readers will hear almost everyone’s point of view in upcoming books.
The books will appear on Oct. 20 as part of a 20th anniversary celebration and exhibition at the British Library. But they aren’t new novels or even plays.
A new digital book about Patricia Neal and Roald Dahl sends readers across the city to solve its riddles.

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