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“Agent Running in the Field” will feature a 26-year-old character navigating political turmoil in present-day London.
Tracy K. Smith, the United States poet laureate, looks at the ways poetry has dealt with the shifting political landscapes of the past two decades.
A Brooklyn novelist’s annual trip to the Chilean countryside fuels daydreams of permanently moving. But peace and quiet can be so, well, exasperating.
By the end of a typical year, hundreds of thousands of books in various styles, genres and subject areas are published. These three lists are meant to help you make sense of it all.
Antonio Scurati, the author of “M,” sees his book as an anti-fascist history lesson disguised as a novel. Others disagree.
Molly Stern will be replaced by David Drake. Gillian Blake will leave Henry Holt for Crown. The changes reflect a cyclical shift in the industry.
Alan Wolfe discusses “The Politics of Petulance,” and Nadja Spiegelman talks about two books by Lucia Berlin.
Harper Lee’s estate objected to elements of Aaron Sorkin’s early stage adaptation. Now it arrives on Broadway with concessions from both sides.
With “Invisible: The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America’s Most Powerful Mobster,” Stephen L. Carter celebrates his extraordinary grandmother.
In “We Begin in Gladness,” the poet and critic Craig Morgan Teicher considers poets from W.S. Merwin to francine j. harris, in light of changes in their language and their influence on one another.
“Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know” recounts the lives of the fathers of Wilde, Yeats and Joyce — and the chaos they created.
In two books he wrote about rudeness and how to avoid it. He also started a program to encourage the practice of good manners.
There’s nothing like the bond between grandparent and grandchild. New books by Tomie dePaola, Cecilia Ruiz and more show it in many forms.
A nod to the classic English bildungsroman “Great Expectations,” first serialized in December 1860.
Four collections, in settings that range from Glasgow to an island in the Pacific Northwest, sketch troubled lives and a yearning for better times.
Alan Wolfe’s “The Politics of Petulance” and Lawrence Lessig’s “America, Compromised” offer differing diagnoses of the condition of the country.
Richard Brookhiser’s “John Marshall” looks at the accomplishments of the legendary chief justice and draws lessons for today.
“Those Who Knew,” a new novel by Idra Novey, takes place on an unnamed island, but in a world beset by problems unnervingly like our own.
A.L. Kennedy’s novella “The Little Snake” conjures the story of a young girl’s friendship with a strangely powerful creature and how it will shape her life.
It turns out that people have liked to give books as gifts for a long time. Here’s a peek at how tastes have changed over the years.

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